The Marylebone Fair – December 1916

Queen Amelie of Portugal was present on Wednesday and formally opened the Marylebone Fair at Claridge’s Hotel, Brook Street, which this year devotes its energies to the aid of the Church of St. Charles, Ogle Street. There was a brilliant gathering assembled on the occasion. Sir Roper Parkington presided, and in his opening remarks said he wished in the name of the committee to express his high delight at such a distinguished and large gathering. He thought the committee were to be congratulated on having obtained the kind assistance of Her Majesty Queen Amelie. ” We all desire to express,” he said, ” in no measured terms our sincere and grateful thanks to Her Majesty, and offer her a most hearty welcome. Her Majesty, like all the members of our own Royal Family, is always willing to aid the cause of charity, no matter at what inconvenience to herself.” Sir Roper referred to Queen Amelie’s recent visit to Southend, and to King Manoel’s visits to Liverpool and Leeds, and said, ” These gracious acts deserve the gratitude of the English nation, more especially in these anxious and troublous times.”

St Charles Ogle Street

Speaking of St. Charles’ Church, he said :—” It is undoubtedly one of the poorest, as well as one of the most deserving churches in London. It was built by a student of the English College in Lisbon, and most of the money was collected in Portugal fifty-five years ago. Some of the statues in the church are by Portuguese artists. Unfortunately, this church is now in difficulties owing to several reasons, among which are the departure for the war of the many foreigners in North Soho who used the church and contributed largely to its upkeep ; the number of factories and shops replacing houses, causing people to live away from their work, and be no longer able to use the church; and the gradual and constant increase of the Jewish element, which is driving out the Christians from the neighbourhood of the church. St. Charles’ Church must, however, continue to exist, for it serves, and has served for the past fifty years without any financial assistance, the Middlesex, University, and Orthopedic Hospitals, all of which now accommodate many sick soldiers requiring the comforts of religion. The income of the church does not even cover current expenses. Then there is the interest on a mortgage of £1,000, and the interest on a loan of £500. The restoration of the outside of the church owing to the serious decay of the stonework will cost at least £500, and it is a work now absolutely necessary.” After setting forward- thus clearly the needs of the church, Sir Roper said he could not sit down without voicing the feeling of gratitude of Father O’Connor to those distinguished persons whose names were on the programme for so kindly associating themselves with the Fair. Their help and support was much appreciated.

Queen Amelie of Portugal

Queen Amelie then declared the Fair open, and wished it every success. After being presented with a number of purses towards the object of the Fair, and listening to a few words of special thanks from Father O’Connor, Her Majesty proceeded to inspect the stalls. The Fair was opened on Thursday by Lady Roper Parkington, Mr. Ernest Oldmeadow presiding.

The above text was found on p.26,16th December 1916 in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .

 

The Roper Parkington’s golden wedding notice 1923

jrp-golden-wedding-1923

GOLDEN WEDDING 1873-1923

ROPER-PARKINGTON—SILVESTER.—At the Church of Our Lady of Grace, Chiswick, W., on June 21st, 1873, by the Rev. F. Doherty, MR., assisted by the Very Rev. Abbot Burder,   J. Roper-Parkington, J.P., of Melbourne House, Chiswick, to Marie Louise, daughter of the late A. Sims Silvester, Esq., of Stanhope Lodge. Chiswick, and of the Stock Exchange.

The above text was found on p.17, 23rd June 1923 in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .

Lady RP’s Appeal for Montenegrin Families 1912

FOR MONTENEGRIN FAMILIES.

SIR,—May I appeal through your columns for help on behalf of the families of the brave Montenegrins who are fighting in the present sad war? They are so very poor that all contributions will be welcome, either in the form of money or provisions, such as tinned food, &c. ; blankets or woollen clothing especially will be acceptable, their mountain climate being extremely severe in the winter.

I will undertake to forward any goods which your readers may be kind enough to send me. Cheques should be crossed ” Union of London and Smith’s Bank,” and large parcels should be addressed, carriage paid, to Lady Roper Parkington, Montenegrin Consulate, 24, Crutched Friars, E.C.

Yours faithfully,

MARIE LOUISE PARKINGTON. 58, Green Street, Park Lane, W.,

October 16, 1912.

The above text was found on p.28, 19th October 1912  in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .

Herman Bicknell and Harriet Bagshawe October 1897

This wedding has entertained me for a while, partly because it is so ludicrously grand, and also for the  guest list, and the wedding presents . It has some members of the wider family at it, though some of the relationships are wildly complicated. Mrs Herman Lescher, for example, was at this point newly widowed, and is the aunt of [Thomas] Edward, Frank Graham,  Carmela , and Adela Lescher, and the wife of Celia O’Bryen’s step-mother’s nephew.  Mrs. Kuypers, is Frank Purssell’s mother in law. Mrs. Charles Cassella, is Edward Lescher’s wife’s aunt,  and then up crop the Roper Parkingtons, though in this incarnation as plain Mrs RP because the knighthood didn’t come until five years later in 1902.

The bride’s parents Judge, and Mrs Bagshawe also crop up at a number of the other weddings, most interestingly Alfred O’Bryen’s wedding in 1900, as does his brother Bishop Bagshawe. Also at some of the other weddings are the Macfarlanes, and the Stanfields,

The other intriguing thing was the almost throwaway line at the end ” the newly married couple left for Milford Haven en-route for Rostellan Castle, County Cork, kindly lent for the honeymoon by Mr. and Mrs Thackwell.”  We’ve come across the Thackwells before; Kitty Pope-Hennessy married Edward Thackwell early in 1894 at Rostellan Castle in Cork. She was a forty-four year old widow, and he was twenty six. He was a year older than her eldest son who died young, and three, and seven, years older than his step-sons.

Rostellan_Castle
Rostellan Castle

Rostellan Castle had been the seat of the Marquis of Thomond for over two hundred years, and was bought by Kitty’s first husband on his retirement. It’s about five miles from Aghada House, which Edward Thackwell’s grandfather bought in 1853, about forty five years after John Roche had built it. It’s all a very small world…………

It all looks so promising, they were both twenty two. He was  born in the spring of 1875, and she was born a little later , in the summer of the same year.  But it all appears to go wrong quite fast, and culminates in a spectacular divorce in 1908.

The Tablet, Page 15, 23rd October 1897

Our Lady of Victories 1908
Our Lady of Victories 1908

The marriage of MR. HERMAN KENTIGERN BICKNELL and Miss HARRIET BAGSHAWE was solemnized at the Pro-Cathedral on Tuesday. The Bishop of Nottingham, uncle of the bride, performed the ceremony, assisted by the Abbot of St. Augustine’s Monastery, and the Very Rev. Canon Bagshawe. The bride, who was given away by her father, Judge Bagshawe, wore a white satin dress with jewelled embroidered front draped with chiffon and Honiton lace. The Bridesmaids were Miss Teresa, Miss Gertrude, and Miss Nelly Bagshawe, sisters of the bride; Miss Henrietta Stanfield, cousin of the bride; Miss H. Bicknell, Miss Muriel Crook, and Miss Frost, cousins of the bridegroom. They wore rose-coloured satin dresses and white felt hats with feathers. Each carried a bouquet of Parma violets and wore a gold bangle set with diamonds, the gift of the bridegroom. The bridegroom was attended by his cousin, Mr. E. Bicknell, as best man. Owing to the large number of wedding guests the reception after the ceremony was held by Judge and Mrs. Bagshawe in the Empress Assembly-room at the Palace Hotel. In the course of the afternoon the newly married couple left for Milford Haven en-route for Rostellan Castle, County Cork, kindly lent for the honeymoon by Mr. and Mrs Thackwell.

Among the many presents were: From the Bridegroom, diamond tiara, two large diamond rings, one large diamond and sapphire ring, gold curb bracelet, gold watch bracelet. From Mrs. Bicknell, diamond crescent brooch, diamond marquise ring; Mrs. Bagshawe, gold and turquoise bracelet ; Judge Bagshawe, silver headed walking stick; Mrs. Hermann Lescher, silver dish and spoon; Mrs. Ullathorne, -silver dish and spoon; Mrs. Mort and Miss Bethell, silver dish; Mrs. Green, silver book marker; Mrs. Danvers Clarke, ivory tusk paper knife; Mrs. Pfachler, photo frame; Miss Roskell, silver frame; Miss N. Roskell, cameo chain bracelet; Miss Pickford, night dress sachet; Lady Parker, large vase; Mr. and Mrs. C. Payne, glass vases; Miss Kerwin, white china vase; Mrs. Shearman, ivory and silver paper knife; Mrs. Fuller, ostrich feather fan; Mrs. Bolton, knife and fork sets; Judge Stonor, silver mounted scent bottle; Mrs. Herbert, turquoise ring; Mr. Morton, Dresden china inkstand; Miss Fortescue, silver mounted purse; Miss N. Fortescue, tortoiseshell carriage clock; Miss Robins, screen; Miss Teresa Bagshawe, gold chain; Mrs. Roper Parkington, books; Miss Gunning, jewel case; Mrs. Cobbold, Nankin vases; Mrs. Noble, blotter; Mrs. Steward, blotter; Lady Macfarlane, antique miniature set with pearls and brilliants; Mrs. Clare, silver mounted scent bottles; Lady Knill, gold lined spoons; Mrs. Hewett, small spoons in case; Mrs. Bagshawe, of Oakes Norton, tortoiseshell and silver paper knife; Miss Eyre, Worcester china vase; Miss Hooper, large flower pot; Mr. and Mrs. Stanfield, dressing case, silver fittings; Mrs. Nettlefold, silver basket; Miss C. Shearman, cushion; Mrs. Troup, silver frame; Lady Austin, hand-painted d’oyleys; Mrs. E. Perry, silver card case; Mrs. Charles Hayes, silver bonbonniere; Mrs. Norman Uniacke, table cloth and d’oyleys; Miss Hall, sacred photos in frame; Count and Countess delle Rochetta, gold and tortoiseshell writing case; Mr. Burton, marble clock; Mrs. Fox, paper knife; Mrs. Payne, silver baskets; Mrs. Kuypers, blotter and paper case; Mrs. Sydney Peters, toast rack; General Sir Frederick Maunsell, tortoiseshell and silver frame; Mrs. D. O’Leary, ivory and silver paper knife; Miss de Freitas Bianco, silver scent bottle; Mr. Bruce, ivory mounted silver bottles; Miss Leeming, antique salt cellars; Mrs. Stafford, silver scent bottle; Mrs. de Colyar, silver bonbonniere; Mrs. Rymer, double silver frame; Miss Henrietta C. Stanfield, silver smelling salts bottle; Mrs. Dunn, frame; Mrs. Bullen, cushion; Miss M. L. Shee, antique casket; Mr. Read, silver pen and pencil; Mr. Fleming, silver frame; Mrs. Mansfield, silver mirror; Miss Allitsen, glove basket; Mademoiselle Delaware, little card case; Miss Gertrude Bagshawe, glove and handkerchief case; Miss Mary Bagshawe, rosary bracelet; Mrs. Le Begue, set of Sevres china plate; Mr. Eland, gold chain bracelet; Mrs. Pridiaux, silver-mounted bottle; Miss Nelly Bagshawe, handkerchief sachet; Miss Lowry, antique gold and silver spoons; Mrs. Semper, Imitation of Christ; Eva and Maurice Stammers, silver and glass sugar basin; Dr. and Mrs. Ball, silver-handled paper knife; Mrs. Chilton, large silver spoons; Misses Chilton, silver preserve jar; Mrs. Jenkins, silver dish; Mrs. Bicknell, cushion, embroidered Indian work; Dr. and Mrs. Bagshawe, large vase; Mrs. O’Brian, silver spoons; Lady de Gee, French clock; Mrs. Clement Bagshawe, casket; Mrs. Charles Goldie, fan; Mr. Waldron, silver tray; Mrs. Henry Slattery, silver frame; Dr. O’Connor, gold and pearl swallow brooch; Mrs. Stephens, vase lamp; Mrs. Anson Yeld, silver salt cellars; Mr. Percy Rogers, ivory and -silver paper knife; Mrs. Lane, silver scent bottle; Mrs. Charles Mathew, antique silver crucifix; Mr. J. Tomlinson, silver napkin rings; Miss Quintor,, menu cards; Miss Graham, silver sugar jar; Mr. James Macarthy, gold bangle set with pearls, emerald shirt pin; Mr. and Mrs. Snead Cox, gold sovereign-purse; Mr. and Mrs. Jessop, silver vases; Mrs. Margetts, handbag fitted; Mr. and Mrs. Pugin, glove and handkerchief bag; Mr. and Mrs. Brown, silver dish for nuts, with cracker; Miss Brown, silver fruit fork; Dr. and Mrs. Ford Anderson, fan; Mr. and Mrs. Jennings, scent bottle; Father Dewar, golden manual; Mr. Owen Lewis, large china vase; Miss C. Bagshawe, necklace of seed pearls; Mr. Nettleship, silver salt cellars; Canon Bagshawe, books; the Bishop of Nottingham, photograph book; Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Stanfield, large silver sugar sifter; Mrs. Charles Cassella, china vase; Mr. Charles Roskell, antique silver dish; Mrs. Charles Russell, silver clock; Miss Henrietta Bicknell, silver purse; Mr. and Mrs. Wood Wilson, inkstand; Mr. Charles Weld, silver horn scent bottle; Father Cox, silver hat brush; Rev. Father Stanfield, work-case; Mrs. Lamb, glass and silver sugar basin. Many other presents were given to the bride and bridegroom, including massive silver salver, silver candlesticks, &c.

 

 

Would the real Lady RP please stand up?

Viewer feedback is the posts have been flagging. So a new one

 

Help are these all the same woman?

The first one is definately Lady Roper Parkington, the second is at the OB wedding in 1924,  and the third is from the Mayor’s garden party in 1914. Both of them are behind the Cardinal in the photo (also on the home page)

Lady JRP Large 1Lady RP?Garden party

The Mayor of Hampstead’s Garden Party – 4th July 1914

It took a lot of digging to try to find out the answers to this one, but it was always the most intriguing photo. Some of the people are clearly identifiable from other photos. Particularly the members of the O’Bryen family, Ernest and Gertrude are easily identifiable either side of the clergyman, with Cis kneeling looking at her mother, and Kenneth and Molly also to the front with their parents. Rex O’Bryen and his wife Florence are standing on the far left.

The clergyman remained mysterious for rather longer, as did most of the others in the picture. He did provide a very useful spur in the search, which rapidly threw up two O’Bryen priests. The first was Father Philip, who was an older brother of Ernest, and Rex. The other was Mgr Henry O’Bryen, who was a much older half-brother.

The Mayor of Hampstead Garden Party 4th July 1914

The clothes provided the next clues, particularly the hat and ring. Fr Phil was a parish priest, so wouldn’t have dressed like that, and Mgr Henry was dead before Ernest and Gertrude married, so it couldn’t be him. Eventually I found this…..

The Tablet Page 17, 11th July 1914 NEWS FROM THE DIOCESES

WESTMINSTER-THE CARDINAL’S ENGAGEMENTS

THE MAYOR OF HAMPSTEAD’S GARDEN PARTY.—The Cardinal Archbishop was entertained by the Mayor and Mayoress of Hampstead, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. O’Bryen, on Saturday last (4th July) at a garden party at their house and grounds at Daleham Lodge. A large company had been invited to meet his Eminence, and were presented to him. Among the guests were Canon Wyndham 0.S.C., Sir Roper and Lady Parkington, Lady Parker, Mgr. Grosch, the Father Superior and several of the Fathers from Farm Street, Prior Bede Jarrett, and several of the Dominican Fathers from Haverstock Hill, Canon Brenan, Mr. Lister Drummond, K.S.G., and Mr. C. J. Munich, K.S.G., and very many others. Refreshments were served in the grounds, and there was some, very enjoyable music.

This now answered some of the questions, but not all, and also is one of the many odd coincidences. One of the Roper Parkington’s granddaughters  Marie marries Alan O’Bryen ten years after this photo, and Colonel Sir John Roper Parkington, and Lady RP have quite a part in this tale. We’ll come back to whether it is the two of them behind the Cardinal, and the Mayor.

Sir George Sherston Baker b. 1846

BAKER, [His Honour Judge] Sir George
Sherston, Bart. — Cr. 1793.


Eldest son of Henry Sherston Baker, Esq., who d. 1875, by Maria Martha, who d.1897, dau. of the late John Burke, Esq. (The Mac-Walter);

b. 1846 ; s. his cousin the Rev. Sir Henry Williams Baker 3rd Bart., 1877; m. 1st 1873 Jane Mary, who d. 1909, younger dau. of the late Frederick James Fegen, Esq.. R.N., CB., of Ballinlonty, Co. Tipperary; 2ndly 1912 Mary Josephine, younger dau. of the late Henry Bacchus, Esq., of Lillington Manor, Warwickshire, and Cote House, Staffordshire.

Sir George Baker, who was called to the Bar at Lincoln’s Inn 1871, and ad eundem at th Middle Temple 1874, is a Magistrate for Lincolnshire, Barnstaple, Bideford, Great Grimsby, Boston, and City of Lincoln ; was Recorder of Helston 1886-9, and
Editor of the ‘Law Magazine and Review’ 1895-8 elected Associate of the Institut du Droit International 1879, and appointed Recorder of Barnstaple and of Bideford 1889, and County Court Judge of Circuit No. 17, 1901. — Castle Moat House, Lincoln ; Devonshire Club, s.w.

Heir, his son Dodington George Richard Sherston, M.E.O.S. L.R.C.P. : Major Indian Medical Service ; b. 1877 ; m. 1901 Irene Mary Roper, youngest dau. of Sir John Roper Parkington, and has, with other issue, a son, Humphrey Codington Benedict Sherston, b. 1907.

Charles Cary-Elwes – Obituary 1947

Beccles & Bungay Journal

 Aug 23 1947      

DEATH of Mr Charles Cary-Elwes, aged 78, of Staithe House, 44 Northgate.
Born in 1869, third son of Captain Windsor Cary-Elwes, of the Scots Guards. Educated at Stonyhurst, became a Benedictine monk at Fort Augustus, Scotland. In 1897 he married Edythe, second daughter of Sir Roper and Lady Parkington, who survives him. There were 8 children.
The welfare of hospitals was his absorbing interest, and he was vice-chairman of the Hospital of St John and St Elizabeth in London. He became a Knight of the Order of St John of Jerusalem (the Knights of Malta) For many years he was the Chancellor in England. He was twice Master of the Distillers Company. He came to Beccles two years ago.