Rory Oge O’More/Ruaidhri og ua Mordha

O’MORE, RORY or RURY OGE (d. 1578), Irish rebel, called in Irish Ruaidhri og ua Mordha, was second son of Rory O’More, captain of Leix, by Margaret, daughter of Thomas Butler, and granddaughter of Pierce or Piers Butler, eighth earl of Ormonde [q. v.] (cf. Lodge, Peerage of Ireland, ed. Archdall, iv. 19; and Harl. MS. 1425, f. 119b). Sir Henry Sidney once called him ‘an obscure and base varlet,’ but his family was one of the most important of the minor Irish septs, and also one of the most turbulent.

Rory O’More (fl. 1554), the father, was son of Connell O’More (d. 1537), and early acquired the character of a violent and successful chieftain. On the death of Connell a fierce dispute broke out between the three sons—Lysaght,Kedagh, and Rory—and their uncle Peter the tanist. Peter was for the time a friend of the Butlers. Consequently the deputy, Lord Leonard Grey, supported the sons; and, although Peter was acknowledged chief, Grey got hold of him by a ruse, and led him about in chains for some time, Kedagh then seems to have secured the chieftainship, Lysaght having been killed; but he died early in 1542, and Rory, the third brother, succeeded. He, after a period of turmoil, agreed on 13 May 1542 to lead a quieter life, and made a general submission, being probably influenced by the fact that Kedagh had left a son of the same name, who long afterwards, in 1565, petitioned the privy council to be restored to his father’s inheritance. Like other Irish chiefs of the time, O’More was only a nominal friend to the English. In a grant afterwards made to his eldest son his services to King Edward VI are spoken of; but they must have been of doubtful value, as an order of 15 March 1550-1 forbade any of the name of O’More to hold land in Leix (App. to 8th Rep. Dep.-Keep. Publ. Rec. Ireland). At some uncertain time between 1550 and 1557 Rory O’More was killed, and was succeeded by a certain Connell O’More, who may be the Connell Oge O’More mentioned in 1556 in the settlement of Leix (cf. Bagwell, Ireland under the Tudors, i. 400, and Cal. State Papers, Irish Ser. 1509-73, pp. 135,414). He was put to death in 1557 (Annals of the Four Masters, ii. 1545). Rory left two sons, Callagh and Rory Oge. Callagh, who was brought up in England, was called by the English ‘The Calough,’ and, as he describes himself as of Gray’s Inn in 1568, he may be assumed to be the John Callow who entered there in 1567 (Foster, Reg. of Gray’s Inn, p. 39). In 1571 Ormonde petitioned for the Calough’s return, and soon afterwards he came back to Ireland, where in 1582 he was thought a sufficiently strong adherent to the English to receive a grant of land in Leix (Cal. State Papers, Irish Ser. 1574-85, pp. 392, 412).

Rory Oge O’More, the second son, was constantly engaged in rebellion. He received a pardon on 17 Feb. 1565-6, but in 1571 he was noted as dangerous, and in 1572 he was fighting Ormonde and the queen at the same time, being favoured by the weakness of the forces at the command of Francis Cosby, the seneschal of Queen’s County, and the temporary absence of Ormonde in England. In this little rebellion the Butlers and the Fitzgeralds were united against him; but when, in November 1572, Desmond escaped from Dublin, it was Rory Oge O’More who escorted him through Kildare and protected him in Queen’s County (cf. 12th Rep. Dep.-Keep. Publ. Rec. Ireland, p. 78). He was mixed up in Kildare’s plots in 1574, and taken prisoner in November. But he was soon free, and Sidney, when on his tour in 1575, wrote of him: ‘Rory Oge O’More hath the possession and settling-place in the Queen’s County, whether the tenants will or no, as he occupieth what he listeth and wasteth what he will.’ However, O’More was afraid of the deputy, and when Sydney came into his territory, he went to meet him in the cathedral of Kilkenny (December 1575), and ‘submitted himself, repenting (as he said) his former faults, and promising hereafter to live in better sort (for worse than he hath been he cannot be).’ Hence we find a new pardon granted to him on 4 June 1576 (ib. p. 179). But in the next year he hoped for help from Spain, and, pushed on by John Burke, his friend, he made a desperate attack on the Pale. He allied himself with some of the O’Connors, and gathered an army. On 18 March 1576-7 the seneschal of Queen’s County was commanded to attack Rory Oge and the O’Connors with fire and sword (13th Rep. Dep.-Keep. Publ. Rec. Ireland, p. 25). There was good reason for active hostilities, as on the 3rd the insurgents had burned Naas with every kind of horror. Sidney wrote to the council the same month: ‘Rory Oge O’More and Cormock M’Cormock O’Conor have burnt the Naas. They ranne thorough the towne lyke hagges and furies of hell, with flakes of fier fastned on poles ends’ (Cal. State Papers, Irish Ser. 1574-85, p. 107; cf. Carew MSS. 1575-88, f. 110). Later in the year O’More captured Harrington and Cosby. They were rescued by a ruse. O’More’s wife and all but O’More himself and one of those who were with him were killed. Infuriated at being caught, O’More fell upon Harrington, ‘hacked and hewed’ him so that Sidney saw his brains moving when his wounds were being dressed, then rushing through a soldier’s legs, he escaped practically naked (Carew MSS. 1575-88, f. 356). He soon afterwards burned Carlow; but in an attempt to entrap Barnaby Fitzpatrick, baron of Upper Ossory, into his hands, he was killed by the Fitzpatricks in June 1578, and his head set up on Dublin Castle. He left a son, Owen McRory O’More, whom John Burke, son of the Earl of Clanricarde, took charge of. The English got hold of him after some difficulty, and foolishly allowed him to return to his own country. He became as great a rebel as his father, and, after a life of fighting and plundering, in which, however, he recovered almost all Leix, was killed in a skirmish near Timahoe, Queen’s County, 17 Aug. 1600. Moryson called him ‘a bloody and bold young man,’ ‘The Four Masters’ an ‘illustrious, renowned, and celebrated gentleman.’ After his death the importance of the O’Mores as a sept was gone.

[Bagwell’s Ireland under the Tudors; Webb’s Compendium of Irish Biogr.; Cal. of State Papers, Irish Ser., and of the Carew MSS.; State Papers; Annals of the Four Masters, ed. O’Donovan, vols. vi. vii.; authorities quoted.]

Source: Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 42 O’More, Rory (d.1578) by William Arthur Jobson Archbold

Grehan of Mount Plunkett. – from Burke’s Landed Gentry [London 1871] with additions

The irony of this entry isn’t mentioned. 2,745 acres were advertised advertised for sale under a bankruptcy proceeding in January 1870, with part re-advertised in May 1870. So sadly, by the time the fourth edition of Burke’s Landed Gentry came out, the gent was landed no longer !

Grehan of Mount Plunkett. from Burke’s Landed Gentry (1871)

Grehan Patrick, esq. of Mount Plunkett and St John’s co Roscommon, J.P., b 21 March 1818; m. 4 April 1842, Frances, eldest dau. of the late John Pitchford, esq. of Norwich, a descendant of the old family of Pitchford of Shropshire, and has issue,

  1. Wilfrid b. 6 Aug 1848
  2. Charles b. Nov 1850
  3. Gerard b. May 1852
  4. Francis b. Oct 1855
  1. Mary O’Conor Graham 
  2. Alice
  3. Louisa 
  4. Clare
  5. Agnes 

Lineage – The family of Grehan claims descent from the Grahams of Montrose, and tradition narrates that its ancestor, escaping from the persecutions in Scotland, fled to Ireland and changed his name to Grehan.

The present Stephan Grehan, esq. of Rutland Square, Dublin succeeded by the recent death of his cousin Major Grehan, s.p. to the representation of the Grehan family. His cousin, Patrick Grehan, esq., now of Mount Plunkett, is the son of the late Patrick Grehan, esq. of Dublin ( by Catherine his 1st wife, dau. of George Meecham, esq., and co-heiress of her mother Catherine, dau. and eventual co-heiress of William Hodson, esq. of St John’s, co. Roscommon) and grandson of Patrick Grehan, esq. of Dublin who m. Judith, dau. and eventually co-heiress of Edward Moore, esq. of Mount Browne, co. Mayo (lineally descended from Lewis, the 4th son of  Roger O’More, of Leix, by Margaret, dau. and heiress of Thomas, 3rd son of Pierce, 8th Earl of Ormonde). Through this marriage with the co-heiress of Moore, Mr Grehan of Mount Plunkett quarters the arms of O’More of Leix, and Butler, Ormonde.

Arms–Or, a trefoil, slipped, vert, on a chief, sa., three escallops, of the first; quartering O’More of Leix, Butler of Ormonde, and Hodson of St. John’s–the family of Hodson of St. John’s, is one of considerable antiquity, and at the decease, in 1829, of the last male heir, Oliver Hodson, Esq., a moiety of the St. John’s estates devolved on the present Patrick Grehan [III], Esq.

Crests–A demi-lion, gu. gorged, with three escallops

Motto–Ne oubliex

Seat–Mount Plunkett, Licarrow, Roscommon

Clonmeen Lodge

So that’s what Bernard Burke has to say; the reference to Stephan Grehan ([1776] – 1871) is slightly confusing, particularly in regard to “succeeded by the recent death of his cousin Major Grehan, s.p. to the representation of the Grehan family”. This branch of the Grehan family are the Grehans of Clonmeen, in co. Cork, and the elder Stephan Grehan really did live until 95. This branch of the family were rather better at holding on to their land than Uncle Patrick. They descend from Peter Grehan, Patrick Grehan Senior’s eldest brother, and his wife Mary Roche. Her brother John Roche married Mary Grehan, their sister. Stephan Grehan ([1776] – 1871) succeeded his father Peter, and was the principal beneficiary of his uncle John Roche. John Roche’s legacy brought Clonmeen into the family, and they successfully held onto it for roughly the next one hundred and fifty years. The family sold Clonmeen in 1975, and the estate and family papers are now in the Boole Library, University College, Cork. At its height in the 1870’s the estate amounted to 7,000 acres [approximately 11 sq. miles]  in co. Cork

There are three Patrick Grehans in this post, I am going to use  suffixes to distinguish between them.  The suffix was not used by them and does not appear in any records. Patrick Grehan III  is Celia O’Bryen’s brother, and so a great, great, great uncle. He was the son of Patrick Grehan Junior (1791 – 1853), grandson of Patrick Grehan Senior (1758 – 1832),  and  Thady Grehan’s (c.1726 – 1792) great grandson. But this post is principally about Uncle Patrick.

St Leonards Bromley-by-Bow

He was born  in Ireland in 1818, and died 1877 in Hampstead.  He married Fanny (Frances Susan) Pitchford in 1842 in Poplar, [probably the parish of St Leonard, Bromley (not the South London one)] London.  She was born 1821 in Stratford, (the Olympics one, not the Shakespeare one) then in Essex, and died 1893 in Hampstead. 

I’ve struggled with whether the Grehans regarded themselves as Irish, or English, or British. In all probability, it’s a mixture of all three, with further shading done with a mixture of class, and religion. The family is fairly mobile, moving between Ireland , and England, and a substantial part of Patrick Grehan III’s early life seems to have been in England, though he was born in Ireland. He is the eldest of the three children of Patrick Grehan Junior by his first wife Catherine Meecham.

    1. Patrick III (born 21 Mar 1818)
    2. Joseph Maunsell (born about 1829)
    3. Celia Mary (born about 1831)

Patrick was born in Ireland, Maunsell in “foreign parts” according to the 1841 census, and Celia in Preston. Initially, it all seems rather peculiar. But as both Patrick, and Maunsell went to Stonyhurst; and Patrick was there between September 1830 and July 1836, it would help explain Celia’s birth in Preston, nearby.

Stonyhurst College

So far, it’s relatively uncomplicated. We have an affluent Anglo/Irish family sending their sons to the oldest Catholic boys school in England. Stonyhurst had started as the Jesuit College at St Omer in what was then the Spanish Low Countries in 1593, moving to Bruges in 1762, then to Liège in 1773, and finally moving to Lancashire in 1794.  Patrick Grehan III was following a family tradition, his father and both uncles went to Stonyhurst soon after it moved to England. Their cousin Stephan Grehan was one of the last pupils to have studied in France, the school being forced to move because of the French Revolution. The tradition continued in the family, with some of Patrick Grehan Junior’s sons, grandsons, great grandsons, and great great grandsons all attending as well.

In 1841, the Grehans were living at Furze Hall, in Fryerning, Essex, where we find Patrick Grehan Junior aged fifty, his wife Harriet, and ten year old Celia, four year old Ignatius,[his only child with his second wife Harriet (nee Lescher)] and four servants. Patrick Grehan Junior had married Harriet Lescher as his second wife, in Brighton in 1836. It was the start of a long inter-linking between the Grehan and Lescher families.

Two Lescher brothers, Joseph Francis, and William had emigrated from Kertzfeld, in Alsace by 1778, eleven years before the fall of the Bastille. The two brothers became partners in a starch factory.  Joseph purchased the estate of Boyles Court in Essex in 1826, but William remained in London, in Bromley, East London where he had married in 1798. The two households are about twenty miles apart.  Boyles Court, is still in the countryside just outside  Brentwood, and just outside the M25. It’s about four miles west of the Petre family at Thorndon Hall, and about ten miles from Furze Hall.

According to “the Life of Sister Mary of Saint Philip” (Fanny Lescher). “William Lescher’s youngest sister Harriet had married Patrick Grehan of Worth Hall. Her stepson, Patrick Grehan, married Fanny Pitchford in 1842, and the young couple made their home at “ The Furze ” at Southweald in Essex, near Boyles Court. In this same year, Fanny Lescher made her social debut at the wedding of another cousin, Eleanor Walmesley, who married Lord Petre’s second son.”

It all gets massively intertwined at this point. But to try to put it as simply as possible. Patrick Grehan Junior married twice, first to Catherine Meecham in 1817, and then, after she died to Harriet Lescher in 1836. The relatively straightforward statement  “Her stepson, Patrick Grehan, married Fanny Pitchford” should also include the fact that Fanny Pitchford is also Harriet’s great niece. William and Harriet’s mother was Mary Ann Copp (1775 –1858), and her elder sister, the splendidly named Cleopha Copp had married John Nyren (1764 -1837). He was a first-class cricketer, and the author of  “The Young Cricketer’s Tutor, comprising full directions for playing the elegant and manly game of cricket, with a complete version of its laws and regulations, by John Nyren; a Player in the celebrated Old Hambledon Club and in the Mary-le-Bone Club.” published in 1833 which was one of the first published Laws of cricket. Their daughter Susan Nyren married John Pitchford (1772 c.-1839) who was a chemist, and political radical  in Norwich. He had also been educated by the Jesuits in St Omer.

So radical, and Catholic; it’s a combustable mixture at a time when both were regarded with suspicion.  Paddy and Fanny were marrying only seven years after the Marriage Act of 1836 had been passed, allowing Catholics to legally marry in Catholic churches; and Catholics in public life were regarded suspiciously up to, and beyond, the turn of the C19th.

It’s not entirely clear whether the newly-weds lived with his father, and step-mother at Furze Hall, or whether Patrick and Harriet had moved. They later lived for a time at his brother’s house, Worth Hall, in Sussex. But certainly in 1841, various sides of the family were in very close proximity. Two of Harriet Grehan’s nephews, Edward and William Lescher were at Stonyhurst, as was her step-son Joseph Maunsell Grehan. All are clearly visible on the census return that year.

“The Grehans left Southweald, in Essex, in the autumn of 1847 to fix their home at Mount Plunket in County Roscommon..” according to the Life of Sister Mary of Saint Philip (Fanny Lescher).  It’s an extraordinary time to move to a poor, rural, part of Ireland. It’s the height of the Famine, in one of the areas that suffered most. They lived at Mountplunkett, Roscommon, Ireland, in the 1850s; leased by Patrick III in 1847 and then bought by him in 1851.  In the 1850s Patrick Grehan III also held lands in the parishes of Killinvoy and St Johns,  co. Roscommon, which he had inherited  via his maternal grandmother,  Catherine Hodson, who was the co-heiress of William Hodson, Lord of the Manor of St. John’s, co. Roscommon.

Patrick Grehan Junior died in Clifton, Bristol,in 1852,  and his will was proved in  London on the 24th March 1853, where Patrick III was the residual legatee. He had previously been left £ 1,000 in his grandfather Patrick Grehan Senior’s will, and received that in 1832.

Patrick Grehan III claimed descent from Rory O’More of Leix, and Thomas, 3rd son of Pierce, 8th Earl of Ormonde, via his paternal grandmother Judith Moore.  As a result, Patrick III was granted Arms in 1863 that included those from St. John’s and quartered O’More of Leix and Butler of Ormonde. There is a record of the confirmation of arms to Patrick Grehan III, in 1863

  • National Library of Ireland: Arms of Grehan of Mount Plunkett, Co Roscommon, 1863. GO MS 179: 101
  • National Library of Ireland:  Copy of confirmation of arms to Patrick Grehan (III), Mount Plunkett & St Johns, Co Roscommon, grandson of Patrick Grehan (Senior)of Dublin, merchant, 5 June 1863. GO MS 109: 13-14

In January 1870 the Estate of Patrick Grehan III amounting to 2,745 acres in the baronies of Athlone, Ballintober, Ballymoe and Castlerea was advertised for sale under a bankruptcy proceeding. The Mountplunkett estate and the part of South Park Demesne in the barony of Castlereagh were re-advertised in May 1870. The Irish Times reported that these lots were sold to Rev. W. West and Owen O’Connor. 

Patrick Grehan III died in Hampstead, in early 1877, at almost the same time as his step-mother Harriet Grehan. This seems to have been at the house of Frank Harwood Lescher [Harriett’s nephew and  Patrick Grehan III’s son-in -law]  Mary O’Conor Graham Grehan [Patrick Grehan III’s daughter] had married her cousin Frank Harwood Lescher [Harriett’s nephew] in 1873.

Link to BLG 1871: http://tinyurl.com/pqu2tuj

Link to Wikipedia for Piers Butler: http://tinyurl.com/nurhox8

Why the Grehans are quite posh.

Patrick Grehan III, Celia O’Bryen’s brother had inherited land in the parishes of Killinvoy and St Johns, barony of Athlone, county Roscommon via their grandmother Catherine Hodson. Their grandmother Judith Grehan (nee Moore) was the great, great, great, great, great grand-daughter of Rory O’More, and Margaret Butler, and therefore related to Anne Boleyn

Rory O’More is sometimes referred to as King of Leix (modern day Co.Laois), but is essentially a clan chieftain. But in Irish terms he is Gaelic nobility, Margaret Butler is the daughter of Piers Butler, the 8th Earl of Ormond. The Butlers are Old English aristocracy, i.e they were part of the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland in the C12th.

Patrick’s entry in Burke’s Landed Gentry in 1871 reads as follows:

Patrick Grehan, esq., now of Mount Plunkett, is the son of the late Patrick Grehan, esq. of Dublin ( by Catherine his 1st wife, dau. of George Meecham, esq., and co-heiress of her mother Catherine, dau. and eventual co-heiress of William Hodson, esq. of St John’s, co. Roscommon) and grandson of Patrick Grehan, esq. of Dublin who m. Judith, dau. and eventually co-heiress of Edward Moore, esq. of Mount Browne, co. Mayo (lineally descended from Lewis, the 4th son of  Roger O’More, of Leix, by Margaret, dau. and heiress of Thomas, 3rd son of Pierce, 8th Earl of Ormonde). Through this marriage with the co-heiress of Moore, Mr Grehan of Mount Plunkett quarters the arms of O’More of Leix, and Butler, Ormonde. 

Arms–Or, a trefoil, slipped, vert, on a chief, sa., three escallops, of the first; quartering O’More of Leix, Butler of Ormonde, and Hodson of St. John’s–the family of Hodson of St. John’s, is one of considerable antiquity, and at the decease, in 1829, of the last male heir, Oliver Hodson, Esq., a moiety of the St. John’s estates devolved on the present Patrick Grehan [III], Esq.

Crests–A demi-lion, gu. gorged, with three escallops

Motto–Ne oubliex

Seat–Mount Plunkett, Licarrow, Roscommon

Their is a record of the confirmation of arms to Patrick Grehan III, in 1863

  • National Library of Ireland: Arms of Grehan of Mount Plunkett, Co Roscommon, 1863. GO MS 179: 101
  • National Library of Ireland:  Copy of confirmation of arms to Patrick Grehan (III), Mount Plunkett & St Johns, Co Roscommon, grandson of Patrick Grehan (Senior)of Dublin, merchant, 5 June 1863. GO MS 109: 13-14

To help the trail a bit:

Patrick Grehan Senior married Judith Moore, daughter of Edward  Moore. Edward Moore was a partner with Thady Grehan, Patrick’s father. In some sources, Thady is referred to as Edward’s drayman, they were brewers together. In which case, it is a pretty spectacular case of social mobility, pretty much, the van driver’s lad marrying the boss’s daughter.

Edward Moore’s father, James died in 1741. James Moore’s great grand father was Walter More.

Walter More’s father was Lewis (Lysagh) O’More,  one of four sons of  Rory O’More (Ruairi Caoch O’Mordha) who married Margaret Butler. Margaret was the daughter of Thomas Butler and granddaughter of Piers Butler, eighth earl of Ormond.

There is more detail in possibly one of the most complicated entries in Burke’s LG, for the More – O’Farrells of Balyna

 

 

Piers Butler, 8th Earl of Ormonde 1467 – 1539

Piers [Butler], 8th Earl of Ormonde later 1st Earl of Ossory

born c 1467, mar. c 1485 Lady Margaret FitzGerald, “the Great Countess” (d. 9 Aug 1542; bur. with her husband in the Church of St Canice, Kilkenny), 2nd dau. of Gerald [FitzGerald], 8th Earl of Kildare, by his first wife Alison FitzEustace, dau. by his second wife of Rowland [FitzEustace], 1st Baron Portlester

children

1. Sir James Butler, later 1st Viscount Thurles later 9th Earl of Ormonde and 2nd Earl of Ossory

2. Richard Butler, later 1st Viscount Mountgarret

3. Thomas Butler (d. 1532)

1. Lady Margaret Butler (d. betw. 9 Sep 1542 and 25 Jul 1551), mar. (1) Hon Thomas FitzGerald (dsp.), 2nd son of Maurice FitzThomas [FitzGerald], 9th Earl of Desmond, and (2) in or bef. 1533 as his first wife Barnaby [FitzPatrick], 1st Baron Upper Ossory, and had issue by her second husband

2. Lady Catherine Butler (d. 17 Mar 1552/3; bur. at Askeaton, co. Limerick), mar. (1) bef. 1526 Richard [Power], 1st Baron Le Power and Coroghmore, and (2) bef. Feb 1549/50 as his third wife James FitzJohn [FitzGerald], 13th Earl of Desmond, and had issue by her first husband

3. Lady Joan Butler, mar. James Butler, Lord of Dunboyne, co. Meath (d. 15 Jan 1538), and had issue

4. Lady Ellice Butler, mar. Gerald FitzJohn FitzGerald, of Dromana, Lord of the Decies (d. 1553), and had issue

5. Lady Ellinor Butler, mar. as his first wife Thomas [Butler], 1st Baron Caher, and had issue

6. Lady Ellen Butler (d. 2 Jul 1597; bur. in St Canice’s Cathedral, Kilkenny), mar. in or bef. 1533 Donogh [O’Brien], 2nd and 1st Earl of Thomond, and had issue

died 26 Aug 1539 (bur. in the Church of St Canice, Kilkenny)

created 23 Feb 1527/8 Earl of Ossory

suc. by son Sir James Butler,

Note

called “The Red Piers”; Sheriff of Kilkenny 1488/9; knighted bef. 1497; Seneschal of the Liberty of Tipperary 1505; Deputy to the 7th Earl of Ormonde for his Irish lands 1505 ‘ granted two parts of the prise of wines in Limerick 1506 ; Chief Governor of Ireland as Lord Deputy 1521/2-24; Lord Treasurer of Ireland 1524; induced by King Henry VIII, along with the coheirs of the 7th Earl of Ormonde, to resign their respective claims to the Earldom of Ormonde; Constable of Dungarvan Castle, co. Waterford 1527/8; Lord Deputy of Ireland 1528-29; granted the Irish estates of the 7th Earl of Ormonde’s coheirs 1537; restored to the Earldom of Ormonde 1537/8.

O’FERRALL OF BALYNA – BLG 1871

O’FERRALL OF BALYNA

More-O’Ferrall.  The Right Hon Richard of Balyna, co Kildare. PC. JP. and DL.           b 1797 m 28 Sept 1839 Hon Matilda Southwell 3rd dau of Anthony 3rd Viscount Southwell KP and has

1.Ambrose Richard

2.Maria Anne m. 1860 to Walter George Nugent Esq eldest son of Sir Percy Nugent, Bart. of Donore.

Mr More O’Ferrall, formerly MP successively for co Kildare and Longford was appointed a Lord of the Treasury 1835, Secretary to the Admiralty 1839, and Secretary to the Treasury 1841. From 1847 to 1851 he held the office of Governor of Malta

Lineage.

Gen1

Anthony O’More chief of his name, Lord of Leix, had a son and two daughters:

  1. Melaghlan O’More d. 1481, m. Catherine daughter. of Conn O’Neill of Tyrone
  2. the elder Dorothy, wife of Thomas Fitzgerald, 7th Earl of Kildare
  3. the younger, m. to Brian Fitzpatrick of Castlebar

gen 2

Melaghlan O’More d. 1481 leaving a son:

Gen3

  1. Connell O’More  m. a dau of Charles O’Dempsey, d. 1518 and left three sons, and one dau

Gen 4

  1. AN other
  2. Roger O’More, Caoch, Lord of Leix. The 2nd son Roger O’More, Caoch, Lord of Leix was slain by his brother Philip 1556. He m. Margaret, daughter and heir of Thomas Butler, 3rd son of Pierce, 8th Earl of Ormonde, and had issue.
  3. Philip
  4. Ellen m. Sir Oliver Grace, Baron of Courtstown.

The 2nd son Roger O’More, Caoch, Lord of Leix was slain by his brother Philip 1556. He m.Margaret, dau. and heir of Thomas Butler, 3rd son of Pierce, 8th Earl of Ormonde, and had issue.

Gen 5

  1. Rory, slain 1578, he had a dau. Honora, wife of John Morres, Esq, co. Tipperary.
  2. Charles of Balyna, (Kedagh,) page to Queen Elizabeth, who gave him Balyna as a new year’s gift. He m. the dau. of Sir Maurice Fitzgerald, Knt of Luagh, co. Kildare
  3. Lewis, whose son

Gen6

Walter, m. Alicia Elliott, and had a son,

Gen 7

  1. Patrick, m.  Joan, dau. of O’Hely, of co. Limerick, father of

Gen 8

  1. Edmund Moore esq, m. Elizabeth, daughter .of Maurice Graham esq , and had, with seven daughters, one son,

Gen 9

  1. James Moore, esq. of Dublin m. Mary, dau. of James Cullen esq, and widow of col. Keating, and d. 2 june 1741, leaving three sons

Gen 10

  1. Roger, who d.s.p.; (decessit sine prole)
  2. Edward, of whom presently;
  3. James, col of a regt in the French service, and afterwards Lieut-Col in the British army, who d. at Fontainbleau, 1813.

The 2nd son, Edward Moore esq of Mount Browne, co. Dublin, m. Jane Reynolds , of Dublin, and dying about the year 1787, left with three daus.,

Gen 11

  1. Jane, wife of Owen O’Conor, esq of Belanagare;
  2. Maria, wife of Valentine O’Connor, esq of Dublin; and
  3. Judith, wife of Patrick Grehan, esq of Dublin

an only son, James Moore esq of Mount Browne, who m. Anne, dau of Denis Byrne esq of co Wicklow, and dying about 1785, left issue

Gen 12

  1. Edward Moore esq of Seamore Place , Mayfair;
  2. Walter Moore esq of Liverpool d. unm.; and
  3. Anne widow of William Jermingham esq, brother of Lord Stafford.

The 2nd son

Charles O’More of Balyna d 1601, leaving (by Margaret Scurloch his wife) two sons and a dau., viz

  1. Roger, col confederated Catholics 1646, m Jane, dau. of  Sir Patrick Barnewall, Knt of Turvey, and had issue
  1. Charles, col in the army, killed at Aughrim 12 july 1691, s.p.
  2. Anne, wife of Patrick Sarsfield, of Lucan, and mother of Patrick, Earl of Lucan.
  3. Eleanor, wife of Daniel, son of Sir Hugh Morogh Kavanagh, Knt.
  4. Mary, wife of Tirlogh O’Neill.
  5. Elizabeth, wife of Christopher Beeling
  1. Lewis, of whose line we treat.
  2. Margaret, m. to Thomas Plunkett, esq of Clonebreney.

The 2nd son,

Col Lewis More, one of the confederated catholics in 1646, m. mary, dau of Philip-Mac Hugh O’Reilly, and was father of Anthony More esq of Balyna who m Anne, dau of Alexander Hope esq of Molingar, and had (with a dau Mary, wife of Capt Conor O’Reilly) two sons,

  1. Lewis his heir,
  2. Roger, whose will (dated 1 march 1746) was proved 9 jan 1748. He m. Ellinor, dau of William Wright esq, and has issue,
  1. Anthony O’More, gen in the Spanish service;
  2. May, wife of Robert Daly esq of Caulfield; and
  3. Mary, wife of Packington Edgeworth, esq of Longwood.

The elder son,

Lewis More, esq of Balyna, m Alicia, dau of Con O’Neill esq, and had with a dau,

  1. Mary, maid of honour to the Queen of Spain, m to –Ward esq of Madrid) a son and heir,
  2. James More esq of Balyna, whose will bears date 13 dec 1778; by Mary his wife, dau of Ambrose Madden esq of Derryhoran, he left an only dau, and heir,

Letitia More who m Richard O’Ferrall esq, only son of Ambrose O’Ferrall esq, by jane Dillion his wife, and dying 1778 (her husband survived till 1790) left several daus, viz,

  1. Mrs Boulger,
  2. Mrs Morris,
  3. Mrs Taylor,
  4. Mrs Pallas of Grouse Hall co Cavan, and
  5. Mrs Nugent of Killasons, co Longford)

And three sons, viz,

  1. Ambrose, his heir,
  2. James, maj-gen in the Austrian service, d 1828 aged 75,
  3. Charles, col in the Sardinian service, d 1831.

The eldest son

Ambrose O’Ferrall esq of Balyna, m 1796, Anne, only child of John Bagot esq of Castle Bagot, co Dublin, by Anne, his 1st wife, only dau, and heiress of W.Walsh esq of Kilmurry, co Meath, by Elizabeth Nangle, his wife, and by her (who d 1810) had issue,

  1. Richard More (Right Hon) now of Balyna House,
  2. John Lewis More, of Lissard, co Longford, J.P. and D.L., barrister-at-law, Commissioner of Metropolitan Police, Dublin, m 1836, Clare, dau of Thomas Segrave esq, a younger son of the Cabra family, and has a son, and three daus
  1. Edward Gerald
  2. Mary,
  3. Mia, and
  4. Ellen.
  1. James More
  2. Robert More, in holy orders, d 1834
  3. Edward More, of Kildangan, co Kildare, High Sheriff co Kildare 1856-7, m 1849, Susan, only child of Dominick O’Reilly esq of Kildangan Castle, co Kildare, and by her (who d 1855) has an only son Dominick, b 1855.
  4. Mary-Ann
  5. Letitie, a nun
  6. Louisa
  7. Catherine
  8. Rose-Anna, m Thomas Errington, esq of Clints, co York

Mr O’Ferrall m 2ndly, 1811, Margaret, youngest dau of the late F.Dunne esq of Brittas, Queen’s county, which lady d 1826. He d 1835, aged 83.

BLG 1871: http://tinyurl.com/oagryqp

More-O’Ferral lineage BLG 1871

O’Ferral of Balyna

More-O’Ferrall The Right Hon. Richard, of Balyna, co. Kildare, ,P.C,J.P. and D.L b. 1797; m.28 sept 1839, Hon Matilda Southwell, 3rd dau. Of Anthony, 3rd Viscount Southwell, K.P, and has,

  1. Ambrose- Richard
  2. Maria-Anne m. 1860 to Walter-George Nugent esq, eldest son of Sir Percy Nugent Bart of Domore.

Mr More-O’Farrell formerly M.P successively for cos. Kildare and Longford was appointed a lord of the treasury 1835, secretary to the Admiralty 1839, and secretary to the treasury 1841. From 1847 to 1851 he held the office of Governor of Malta.

Lineage.

Anthony O’More chief of his name, Lord of Leix, had (with two daus, the elder Dorothy, wife of Thomas Fitzgerald, 7th Earl of Kildare, and the younger, m. to Brian Fitzpatrick of Castlebar) a son.

Melaghlan O’More who d. 1481 leaving (by Catherine his wife dau. of Conn O’Neill of Tyrone) a son

Connell O’More who m. a dau of Charles O’Dempsey, and left (at his decease) 1518, three sons, and one dau Ellen,( wife of Sir Oliver Grace, Baron of Courtstown.)

The 2nd son Roger O’More, Caoch, Lord of Leix was slain by his brother Philip 1556. He m.Margaret, dau. and heir of Thomas Butler, 3rd son of Pierce, 8th Earl of Ormonde, and had issue.

  1. Rory, slain 1578, he had a dau. Honora, wife of John Morres, Esq, co. Tipperary.
  2. Charles of Balyna,

Kedagh, page to Queen Elizabeth, who gave him Balyna as a new year’s gift. He m. the dau. of Sir Maurice Fitzgerald, Knt of Luagh, co. Kildare

  1. Lewis, whose son Walter, m. Alicia Elliott, and had a son,
  1. Patrick, father of (by Joan, his wife, dau. of O’Hely, of co. limerick)
  1. Edmund Moore esq., who (m. Elizabeth, dau.of Maurice Graham esq)., and had (with seven daus.) one son,
  1. James Moore, esq. of Dublin who d. 2 june 1741, leaving (by Mary his wife, dau. of James Cullen esq, and widow of col. Keating) three sons
  1. Roger, who d.s.p.; (decessit sine prole)
  2. Edward, of whom presently;
  3. James, col of a regt in the French service, and afterwards Lieut-Col in the British army, who d. at Fontainbleau, 1813.

The 2nd son, Edward Moore esq of Mount Browne, co. Dublin, m. Jane Reynolds , of Dublin, and dying about the year 1787, left with three daus.,

  1. Jane, wife of Owen O’Conor, esq of Belanagare;
  2. Maria, wife of Valentine O’Connor, esq of Dublin; and
  3. Judith, wife of Patrick Grehan, esq of Dublin

an only son, James Moore esq of Mount Browne, who m. Anne, dau of Denis Byrne esq of co Wicklow, and dying about 1785, left issue

  1. Edward Moore esq of Seamore Place , Mayfair;
  2. Walter Moore esq of Liverpool d. unm.; and
  3. Anne widow of William Jermingham esq, brother of Lord Stafford.

The 2nd son

Charles O’More of Balyna d 1601, leaving (by Margaret Scurloch his wife) two sons and a dau., viz

  1. Roger, col confederated Catholics 1646, m Jane, dau. of  Sir Patrick Barnewall, Knt of Turvey, and had issue
  1. Charles, col in the army, killed at Aughrim 12 july 1691, s.p.
  2. Anne, wife of Patrick Sarsfield, of Lucan, and mother of Patrick, Earl of Lucan.
  3. Eleanor, wife of Daniel, son of Sir Hugh Morogh Kavanagh, Knt.
  4. Mary, wife of Tirlogh O’Neill.
  5. Elizabeth, wife of Christopher Beeling
  1. Lewis, of whose line we treat.
  2. Margaret, m. to Thomas Plunkett, esq of Clonebreney.

The 2nd son,

Col Lewis More, one of the confederated catholics in 1646, m. mary, dau of Philip-Mac Hugh O’Reilly, and was father of Anthony More esq of Balyna who m Anne, dau of Alexander Hope esq of Molingar, and had (with a dau Mary, wife of Capt conor O’Reilly) two sons,

  1. Lewis his heir,
  2. Roger, whose will (dated 1 march 1746) was proved 9 jan 1748. He m. ellinor, dau of william wright esq, and has issue,
  1. Anthony o’more, gen in the Spanish service;
  2. May wife of Robert daly esq of Caulfield; and
  3. Mary, wife of Packington Edgeworth, esq of Longwood.

The elder son,

Lewis More, esq of Balyna, m Alicia, dau of Con O’Neill esq, and had with a dau,

  1. Mary, maid of honour to the queen of spain, m to –Ward esq of Madrid) a son and heir,
  2. James more esq of Balyna, whose will bears date 13 dec 1778; by Mary his wife, dau of Ambrose Madden esq of derryhoran, he left an only dau, and heir,

Letitia More who m Richard O’Ferrall esq, only son of Ambrose O’Ferrall esq, by jane Dillion his wife, and dying 1778 (her husband survived till 1790) left several daus, viz,

  1. Mrs Boulger,
  2. Mrs Morris,
  3. Mrs taylor,
  4. mrs Pallas of grouse Hall co cavan, and
  5. Mrs Nugent of Killasons, co Longford)

And three sons, viz,

  1. Ambrose, his heir,
  2. James, maj-gen in the Austrian service, d 1828 aged 75,
  3. Charles, col in the Sardinian service, d 1831.

The eldest son

Ambrose O’Ferrall esq of Balyna, m 1796, anne, only child of john Bagot esq of castle Bagot, co Dublin, by Anne, his 1st wife, only dau, and heiress of W.Walsh esq of Kilmurry, co meath, by Elizabeth Nangle, his wife, and by her (who d 1810) had issue,

  1. Richard More (Right Hon) now of Balyna House,
  2. John Lewis More, of Lissard, co Longford, J.P. and D.L., barrister-at-law, Commissioner of Metropolitan Police, Dublin, m 1836, Clare, dau of Thomas Segrave esq, a younger son of the Cabra family, and has a son, and three daus
  1. Edward Gerald
  2. Mary,
  3. Mia, and
  4. Ellen.
  1. James More
  2. Robert More, in holy orders, d 1834
  3. Edward More, of Kildangan, co Kildare high sheriff co Kildare 1856-7, m 1849, Susan, only child of Dominick O’Reilly esq of Kildangan Castle, co Kildare, and by her (who d 1855) has an only son Dominick, b 1855.
  4. Mary-Ann
  5. Letitie, a nun
  6. Louisa
  7. Catherine
  8. Rose-Anna, m Thomas Errington, esq of Clints, co York

Mr O’Ferrall m 2ndly, 1811, Margaret, youngest dau of the late f.Dunne esq of Brittas, Queen’s county, which lady d 1826. He d 1835, aged 83

BLG 1871: http://tinyurl.com/oagryqp